whenyouworkatamuseum

When an unstoppable forces meets a totally fragile object…

whenyouworkatamuseum:

That time a toddler ran full speed into an oil painting: 

And when the conservator came to inspect the damage: 

I’ve never really been a fan of those baby leashes that  some people use, but this submission made me reconsider my stance. 

THIS!!!

I feel like I spend most if my time checking incident reports of visitors touching the art!

hyperosmia

beckyblackbooks:

buckyy-barness:

In 1940, knowing that France was falling into the hands of the Germans, the workers of the Louvre took action. All 400,000 works were evacuated and sent to the south of France. In secret they transported the priceless paintings and statues, and held by wealthy families in Vichy,where they would remain for five years, only returning at the end of the war.The quick action of the workers without a doubt saved the masterpieces from becoming part of the over 5 million works that were looted by the Nazis during the war.

I’m picturing the Nazis showing up to find the place empty and nobody there but a night watchman who says he doesn’t know anything about any paintings and statues.

Identifying Craquelure on Paintings
Top Left: Typical 14th and 15 C Italian panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 15th C Italian panels can have two distinct generations or widths, tend to be jagged and have a predominant direction perpendicular to the wood grain.
Top Right: Typical 16th C Flemish panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 16th C Flemish panels tend to be small, orderly, of uniform width, and parallel to the wood grain.
Bottom Left: Typical 17th C Dutch canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 17th C Dutch canvas paintings may be straight, jagged, and perpendicular to the warp.
Bottom Right: Typical 18th C French canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 18th C French canvas paintings are more random, curved, large, and are usually connected. 
None of these statements are always true, but can be used as a general guideline; many characteristics depend on the artist’s individual methods and materials. 

Source: directly quoted from Conservation of Easel Paintings, Joyce Hill Stoner and Rebecca Rushfield, 2012.

Identifying Craquelure on Paintings

Top Left: Typical 14th and 15 C Italian panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 15th C Italian panels can have two distinct generations or widths, tend to be jagged and have a predominant direction perpendicular to the wood grain.

Top Right: Typical 16th C Flemish panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 16th C Flemish panels tend to be small, orderly, of uniform width, and parallel to the wood grain.

Bottom Left: Typical 17th C Dutch canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 17th C Dutch canvas paintings may be straight, jagged, and perpendicular to the warp.

Bottom Right: Typical 18th C French canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 18th C French canvas paintings are more random, curved, large, and are usually connected. 

None of these statements are always true, but can be used as a general guideline; many characteristics depend on the artist’s individual methods and materials. 

Source: directly quoted from Conservation of Easel Paintings, Joyce Hill Stoner and Rebecca Rushfield, 2012.